Hitting the snooze button confuses your mind



The body needs some time to get you ready to wake up. 

When you let yourself go back to sleep after you have snoozed your alarm, your body thinks, "False alarm! I guess I didn't need to do anything, because we're not getting up after all," and settles in.

When that buzzer goes off a second time, your body and brain are taken by surprise, resulting in that groggy, fuzzy-headed feeling called sleep inertia (a physiological state of impaired cognitive and sensory-motor performance that is present immediately after awakening).


The more you snooze, the more confused your body and brain get ("So are we going back to sleep or not?!"), so you'll probably feel more out of it even though you actually spent extra time in bed.

What you should do instead

A study recommends setting your alarm for the time you have to get up and then actually get up when it goes off, every day at the same time. Eventually, this consistency may help you feel naturally sleepy at the end of your day, so you'll feel compelled to go to bed when your body needs to, and then wake up without the need for an alarm.

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